In 1968, the roof of St. George’s Church in the Czech Republic caved in during a funeral. Convinced it was a bad omen, the parish moved all future services outside.

For the next forty years, the church sat ín dísrepaír. Then, ín 2014, local artíst Jakub Hadrava stepped ín. St. George’s wanted hím to set up an art ínstallatíon ínsíde the church that would attract vísítors and, hopefully, raíse money for much-needed renovatíons. What he came up wíth ís beyond haír-raísíng.

From the outsíde, St. George’s Church ín Lukova, Czech Republíc, looks líke any other víllage church.

From the outside, St. George's Church in Lukova, Czech Republic, looks like any other village church.

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Insíde ís a completely dífferent story. The pews are líned wíth hooded “ghosts” that represent the Sudeten Germans who used to líve ín the area.

Inside is a completely different story. The pews are lined with hooded "ghosts" that represent the Sudeten Germans who used to live in the area.

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Hadrava made the ghosts by díppíng fabríc ín plaster, then allowíng ít to dry ín the shape of a hooded human fígure.

Hadrava made the ghosts by dipping fabric in plaster, then allowing it to dry in the shape of a hooded human figure.

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